Iron Age Dagger and 700-Year-Old Village Found in Scotland Beneath Motorway!

Iron Age Dagger and 700-Year-Old Village Found in Scotland Beneath Motorway!


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Four buildings, part of a Scottish medieval settlement, discovered beneath a motorway hard shoulder in Scotland in 2016 stood “no chance” of being destroyed over the last 700 years. They were “magically protected” by an Iron Age dagger which archaeologists say was a talisman applied in the battle against malevolent supernatural forces.

On Friday, 26th February 2016, The Scotsman awarded iconic British comedian Ronnie Corbett with Joke of the week. Corbett said, “We've just heard that a juggernaut of onions has shed its load all over the M1. Motorists are advised to find a hard shoulder to cry on.” However, if you were to cry on a particular motorway hard shoulder on the M74 in North Lanarkshire in Scotland your tears would fall on a 700-year-old Scottish medieval settlement.

The M74 construction project near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, Scotland, where the “Netherton” Scottish medieval settlement was discovered. ( GUARD Archaeology )

Medieval Scottish Settlement: Blacksmiths, Tools, Talismans

The remains of the medieval Scottish settlement, dating from the 14th to the 17th century AD, were unearthed on a hard shoulder known as Netherton Cross, near Bothwell, in a North Lanarkshire, Scotland.

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A recent article in The Scotsman says the discovery is “remarkable,” not only because of the range of buildings from different time periods, but for the quality of the artifacts recovered at the road-side site.

Among the ancient tools discovered at medieval Scottish settlement site was a spindle whorl , spinning yarns, and a whetstone for sharpening agricultural blades that was once spat on.

The archaeologists also found evidence of iron smelting , bloom refining, and blacksmithing based on a collection of nails. And in the 17th century archaeological layer two coins were found.

However, the crown jewel in this discovery was an ancient iron dagger. Dr. Natasha Ferguson, of GUARD Archaeology, one of the co-authors of a new report on the discovery, told Smithsonian that the ancient weapon wasn’t used for fighting, but for “protecting buildings from 'magical' harm.”

The outline of the Iron Age dagger found at the Bothwell Scottish medieval settlement site. ( GUARD Archaeology )

The Iron-Age Dagger Protected Settlement From All Demons

Dr. Gemma Cruickshanks, of the National Museums Scotland, said the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried and that it was “intact and still useable at that time.” It is thought the dagger was made in the Iron Age and that it was carefully deposited during the medieval period at this site in a ritual of some sort.

So far as the nature of the magic being applied here is concerned the researchers assume it was to “protect the building and its inhabitants from some real, or perceived, nefarious outside force.”

Dr Ferguson said the practice of leaving special objects beneath the floors in medieval and post-medieval buildings “was to safeguard the building and its inhabitants from magical harm.” Dr Ferguson wrote that the deposition of these objects under the foundation level of one of the houses “may have been intended to affirm this space as a place of safety for them and generations to come.” And because the dagger was so ancient even in mediaeval times it would have had an “otherworldly appeal,” according to the archaeologist.

The Netherton Cross was moved to its current location, from where it was originally found near Bothwell, to Hamilton Parish Church in 1925. ( Transport Scotland )

How Humans Went From Hunting To Medieval Farming Villages

Ever since humans began hunting, and especially with the birth of farming, groups of humans deemed it very important to appease the spirits . However, in today’s modern world science has triumphed over most troublesome “natural” forces , mostly with draft excluders and walls that don’t let wind in.

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And in the new world of farming: blizzards, snow and ice generally don’t lead to food scarcity and Armageddon. But in Neolithic times , without computer-aided design, barometers, weather satellites and massive indoor agriculture centers and warehouses, magic, ritual, and sacrifice was the only way to actively try to maintain a cosmic balance and, thus, survival.

With expanding agricultural communities in Iron Age Britain, it became necessary to feed more people including all the field workers and food processing hands, but also builders, craftsmen.

From the original small groups of people making offerings to their gods at specific places that were abundant with natural resources, temporary then permanent settlements grew near these sacred sites which were managed by emerging religious elites. Through organized ritual, like burying swords beneath buildings, together, as communities, we first domesticated ourselves, then plants, then vegetables and finally animals.

Only then did we achieve the luxury of spare time, with which we engineered the Stone Age marvels which pepper Britain’s landscapes today.


The Scotsman reports that traces of four buildings dating from the fourteenth to the seventeenth centuries were uncovered during roadwork in southern Scotland at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74.

An artist’s reconstruction of how the settlement at Netherton Cross would have looked. It disappeared in the 18th Century as the Duke of Hamilton embarked on turning part of his estate into a vast parkland.

Pottery – including sherds of cooking pots and bowls, a clay tobacco pipe, gaming pieces and evidence of metalworking were found on the site in a series of “remarkable” discoveries.

Under one building, an intriguing collection of artefacts was found in the foundations. Among the items were a spindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins – and an iron dagger.

Archaeologists at the site of the “remarkable” discovery of a lost village right next to the hard shoulder of the M74

It is thought the dagger, which could date from the Iron Age, may have been left as part of a ritual to protect the building and its inhabitants from ‘magical’ harm.

Dr Natasha Ferguson, of GUARD Archaeology, one of the co-authors of the report, said: “The special or talismanic qualities of this dagger as a protective object may have enhanced the ritual act to protect the household from worldly and magical harm.

“The deposition of these objects under the foundation level of one of the houses may have been intended to affirm this space as a place of safety for them and generations to come.”

Map showing the excavation site at Netherton Cross.

The practice of leaving special objects in medieval and post-medieval buildings is well documented and it was believed such a ritual would safeguard the building and its inhabitants.

The report found a “deliberate selection” of objects had been placed at the property.

It is believed the spindle whorl, gaming piece and the whetstone may have represented a personal connection to an individual, activity, or place that would make them special to the occupants.

The report added: “The dagger’s potential antiquity as a prehistoric object perhaps lent it a quality of otherness. Reuse of prehistoric objects as depositions in medieval settings has been recorded in excavations of medieval churches in England, and flint arrowheads were traditionally identified as ‘elf-bolts’ and long recognised for their malevolent magical properties.”

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried.

She added: “It was probably intact and still useable at that time. The form of this dagger is indistinguishable from Iron Age examples, indicating this simple dagger form had a very long history.”

Evidence of iron smelting, bloom refining and probable blacksmithing was also recovered, along with a selection of nails.

The settlement was close to the 10th Century Netherton Cross, which now stands in Hamilton Old Parish Church. Netherton Cross is around 1km away from Bothwell Bridge, the scene of the 1679 battle which ended the Covenanter rebellion in Scotland.

“It is very possible the community was affected by the conflict, either suffering damage to property or as a witness to the route of the Covenanter forces,” the report said.

Netherton vanished in the 18th Century given improvements to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a well-ordered and symmetrical parkland built in its place.

The motorway then subsumed most of the village with the four stone structures the last traces of the settlement.


  • The settlement was discovered near Bothwell Bridge, the scene of a 1679 battle
  • Archaeologists found traces of four buildings from the 14th to 17th century
  • Aspindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins and an ancient iron dagger were also discovered at the site

Published: 16:34 BST, 25 May 2021 | Updated: 18:36 BST, 25 May 2021

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway, with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the buildings.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74.

A series of 'remarkable' discoveries have been made at the site, including a spindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins and an ancient iron dagger.

The dagger could date back from the Iron Age and is thought to have been left as part of a ritual to protect the building and its inhabitants from 'magical' harm.

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway in North Lanarkshire with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the buildings

What happened to the village of Netherton?

The village of Netherton was swept away in the eighteenth century by improvements to the estate by the Dukes of Hamilton, transforming the site into well-ordered and symmetrical parkland with wide avenues and enclosures.

And then later came the motorway, which subsumed most of the village the four stone structures encountered during excavation represent the last vestiges of this lost village.

The practice of leaving special objects in medieval and post-medieval buildings is well documented and it was believed such a ritual would safeguard the building and its inhabitants.

Dr Natasha Ferguson, of GUARD Archaeology, one of the co-authors of the report, said: 'The special or talismanic qualities of this dagger as a protective object may have enhanced the ritual act to protect the household from worldly and magical harm.

'The deposition of these objects under the foundation level of one of the houses may have been intended to affirm this space as a place of safety for them and generations to come.

'The dagger's potential antiquity as a prehistoric object perhaps lent it a quality of otherness.

'Reuse of prehistoric objects as depositions in medieval settings has been recorded in excavations of medieval churches in England, and flint arrowheads were traditionally identified as 'elf-bolts' and long recognised for their malevolent magical properties.'

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell (artist's impression)

A map of the site shows how the four buildings, dating from the 14th to the 17th century, were discovered right next to the M74 motorway


Lost medieval village is discovered next to the motorway in North Lanarkshire

  • The settlement was discovered near Bothwell Bridge, the scene of a 1679 battle
  • Archaeologists found traces of four buildings from the 14th to 17th century
  • Aspindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins and an ancient iron dagger were also discovered at the site

Published: 16:34 BST, 25 May 2021 | Updated: 17:59 BST, 25 May 2021

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway, with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the buildings.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74.

A series of ‘remarkable’ discoveries have been made at the site, including a spindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins and an ancient iron dagger.

The dagger could date back from the Iron Age and is thought to have been left as part of a ritual to protect the building and its inhabitants from ‘magical’ harm.

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway in North Lanarkshire with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the buildings

What happened to the village of Netherton?

The village of Netherton was swept away in the eighteenth century by improvements to the estate by the Dukes of Hamilton, transforming the site into well-ordered and symmetrical parkland with wide avenues and enclosures.

And then later came the motorway, which subsumed most of the village the four stone structures encountered during excavation represent the last vestiges of this lost village.

The practice of leaving special objects in medieval and post-medieval buildings is well documented and it was believed such a ritual would safeguard the building and its inhabitants.

Dr Natasha Ferguson, of GUARD Archaeology, one of the co-authors of the report, said: ‘The special or talismanic qualities of this dagger as a protective object may have enhanced the ritual act to protect the household from worldly and magical harm.

‘The deposition of these objects under the foundation level of one of the houses may have been intended to affirm this space as a place of safety for them and generations to come.

‘The dagger’s potential antiquity as a prehistoric object perhaps lent it a quality of otherness.

‘Reuse of prehistoric objects as depositions in medieval settings has been recorded in excavations of medieval churches in England, and flint arrowheads were traditionally identified as ‘elf-bolts’ and long recognised for their malevolent magical properties.’

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell (artist’s impression)

A map of the site shows how the four buildings, dating from the 14th to the 17th century, were discovered right next to the M74 motorway

She added: ‘It was probably intact and still useable at that time.

‘The form of this dagger is indistinguishable from Iron Age examples, indicating this simple dagger form had a very long history.’

The archaeological work, which was funded by Transport Scotland, found evidence of iron smelting, bloom refining, and probable blacksmithing, along with a selection of nails.

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried (artist’s impression pictured)

Netherton vanished in the 18th Century given improvements to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a well-ordered and symmetrical parkland built in its place. The motorway then subsumed most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement

The settlement was close to the 10th Century Netherton Cross, which is around 1km away from Bothwell Bridge, the scene of the 1679 battle which ended the Covenanter rebellion in Scotland.

Netherton vanished in the 18th Century given improvements to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a well-ordered and symmetrical parkland built in its place.

The motorway then subsumed most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement.

The report said: ‘It is very possible the community was affected by the conflict, either suffering damage to property or as a witness to the route of the Covenanter forces.’

The ‘remarkable’ medieval village and its treasure trove of goods were discovered at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire

The Battle of Bothwell Bridge

Following success against the military at the recent Battle of Drumclog, the Conventiclers’ support had swollen to six thousand when they came together at Hamilton in June 1679.

Differences between Covenanters which had undermined them through the 1650s, again created factions among their numbers.

While some argued that their direction should be decided by a General Assembly which acknowledged the established powers, others denounced the governing bodies and their ‘Indulgences’.

Meanwhile, with ten thousand men and discipline, the Duke of Monmouth, the Earl of Linlithgow and the vengeful Graham of Claverhouse mustered by the Clyde Bridge at Bothwell.

On 22 June they attacked the disorganised Covenanters and won easily.

Although deaths on the field were few, two hundred were killed later.

Of the fourteen hundred who were captured or surrendered, another two hundred and fifty eight were shipwrecked while being transported in The Crown of London.


  • The settlement was discovered near the Bothwell Bridge, the scene of a 1679 battle
  • Archaeologists have found traces of four buildings from the 14th to the 17th century
  • A whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th century coins and an ancient iron dagger were also found at the site.

By Shivali Best For Mailonline

Published: 4:34 p.m. EDT, May 25, 2021 | Update: 4:34 p.m. EDT, May 25, 2021

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a highway, with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the abandoned buildings.

One report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to the 17th century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74.

A series of ‘remarkable’ finds were made at the site, including a spindle for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th century coins and an ancient iron dagger.

The dagger could date back to the Iron Age and was reportedly left as part of a ritual to protect the building and its inhabitants from “ magical ” damage.

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a highway with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the abandoned buildings

What happened to the village of Netherton?

The village of Netherton was washed away in the 18th century by improvements to the estate by the Dukes of Hamilton, transforming the site into a tidy, symmetrical park with wide avenues and enclosures.

And then later came the highway, which encompassed most of the village the four stone structures encountered during the excavations represent the last vestiges of this lost village.

The practice of leaving special items in medieval and post-medieval buildings is well documented and it was believed that such a ritual would protect the building and its inhabitants.

Dr Natasha Ferguson, GUARD Archeology, one of the report’s co-authors, said: ‘The special or talismanic qualities of this dagger as a protective object may have enhanced the ritual act to protect the house from material and magical damage.

“The deposit of these objects below the foundation level of one of the houses may have been intended to assert this space as a place of safety for them and for generations to come.

“The potential antiquity of the dagger as a prehistoric object may have lent it a quality of otherness.

“ The reuse of prehistoric objects as depositions in medieval settings has been recorded during excavations of medieval churches in England, and flint arrowheads were traditionally identified as ‘elf bolts’ and long recognized for their malicious magical properties. ”

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of the National Museums of Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time of her burial.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to the 17th century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74 (artist’s impression)

A site map shows how the four buildings, dating from the 14th to the 17th century, were discovered just off the M74 motorway

She added: ‘It was probably intact and still usable at the time.

“The shape of this dagger is indistinguishable from the Iron Age examples, indicating that this simple dagger shape has a very long history.

Archaeological work, which was funded by Transport Scotland, found evidence of iron smelting, flower refining and probable forging, as well as a selection of nails.

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, National Museums of Scotland, said the dagger appeared to be covered with a sheath at the time of its burial (artist’s print in the photo)

Netherton disappeared in the 18th century thanks to improvements made to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a tidy and symmetrical park built in its place. The highway then swallowed up most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement.

The settlement was near the 10th century Netherton Cross, which is approximately 1 km from Bothwell Bridge, the scene of the 1679 battle that ended the Covenanter Rebellion in Scotland.

Netherton disappeared in the 18th century thanks to improvements made to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a tidy and symmetrical park built in its place.

The motorway then swallowed up most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement.

The report said: “It is very possible that the community was affected by the conflict, either by suffering property damage or by witnessing the route of the Covenanter forces.”

The ‘remarkable’ medieval village and its treasury of goods were discovered at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire

The Battle of Bothwell Bridge

After the success against the military in the recent Battle of Drumclog, support for the Conventiclers had grown to six thousand when they met in Hamilton in June 1679.

The differences between the Covenanters, which had weakened them during the 1650s, again created factions among them.

While some argued that their direction should be decided by a General Assembly recognizing established powers, others denounced governing bodies and their “indulgences”.

Meanwhile, with ten thousand men and discipline, the Duke of Monmouth, Earl of Linlithgow and Avenger Graham of Claverhouse assembled by the Clyde Bridge at Bothwell.

On June 22, they attacked the disorganized Covenanters and won easily.

Although deaths on the ground were rare, two hundred were later killed.

Of the fourteen hundred that were captured or returned, two hundred and fifty-eight were wrecked while being transported to the Crown of London.


Remains of ‘lost medieval village’ found next to motorway

Ancient dagger also found buried under abandoned building in North Lanarkshire, off the M74 motorway.

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Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the abandoned buildings.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74.

There was a series of “remarkable” discoveries made at the site, including a spindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins, and an ancient iron dagger.

The dagger could date back from the Iron Age and is thought to have been left as part of a ritual to protect the building and its inhabitants from “magical” harm.

The practice of leaving special objects in medieval and post-medieval buildings is well documented and it was believed such a ritual would safeguard the building and its inhabitants.

Dr Natasha Ferguson, of GUARD Archaeology, one of the co-authors of the report, said: “The special or talismanic qualities of this dagger as a protective object may have enhanced the ritual act to protect the household from worldly and magical harm.

“The deposition of these objects under the foundation level of one of the houses may have been intended to affirm this space as a place of safety for them and generations to come.

“The dagger’s potential antiquity as a prehistoric object perhaps lent it a quality of otherness. Reuse of prehistoric objects as depositions in medieval settings has been recorded in excavations of medieval churches in England, and flint arrowheads were traditionally identified as ‘elf-bolts’ and long recognised for their malevolent magical properties.”

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried.

She added: “It was probably intact and still useable at that time.

“The form of this dagger is indistinguishable from Iron Age examples, indicating this simple dagger form had a very long history.”

The archaeological work, which was funded by Transport Scotland, found evidence of iron smelting, bloom refining, and probable blacksmithing was also recovered, along with a selection of nails.

The settlement was close to the 10th Century Netherton Cross, which is around 1km away from Bothwell Bridge, the scene of the 1679 battle which ended the Covenanter rebellion in Scotland.

Netherton vanished in the 18th Century given improvements to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a well-ordered and symmetrical parkland built in its place.

The motorway then subsumed most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement.

The report said: “It is very possible the community was affected by the conflict, either suffering damage to property or as a witness to the route of the Covenanter forces.”


Lost medieval village is discovered next to the motorway in North Lanarkshire

  • The settlement was discovered near Bothwell Bridge, the scene of a 1679 battle
  • Archaeologists found traces of four buildings from the 14th to 17th century
  • Aspindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins and an ancient iron dagger were also discovered at the site

Published: 16:34 BST, 25 May 2021 | Updated: 18:36 BST, 25 May 2021

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway, with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the buildings.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire, next to the hard shoulder of the M74.

A series of ‘remarkable’ discoveries have been made at the site, including a spindle whorl for weaving, a whetstone for sharpening tools, two 17th Century coins and an ancient iron dagger.

The dagger could date back from the Iron Age and is thought to have been left as part of a ritual to protect the building and its inhabitants from ‘magical’ harm.

Remains of a lost medieval village have been discovered next to a motorway in North Lanarkshire with an ancient dagger found buried under one of the buildings

What happened to the village of Netherton?

The village of Netherton was swept away in the eighteenth century by improvements to the estate by the Dukes of Hamilton, transforming the site into well-ordered and symmetrical parkland with wide avenues and enclosures.

And then later came the motorway, which subsumed most of the village the four stone structures encountered during excavation represent the last vestiges of this lost village.

The practice of leaving special objects in medieval and post-medieval buildings is well documented and it was believed such a ritual would safeguard the building and its inhabitants.

Dr Natasha Ferguson, of GUARD Archaeology, one of the co-authors of the report, said: ‘The special or talismanic qualities of this dagger as a protective object may have enhanced the ritual act to protect the household from worldly and magical harm.

‘The deposition of these objects under the foundation level of one of the houses may have been intended to affirm this space as a place of safety for them and generations to come.

‘The dagger’s potential antiquity as a prehistoric object perhaps lent it a quality of otherness.

‘Reuse of prehistoric objects as depositions in medieval settings has been recorded in excavations of medieval churches in England, and flint arrowheads were traditionally identified as ‘elf-bolts’ and long recognised for their malevolent magical properties.’

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried.

A report found traces of four buildings, which date from the 14th to 17th Century, at Netherton Cross near Bothwell (artist’s impression)

A map of the site shows how the four buildings, dating from the 14th to the 17th century, were discovered right next to the M74 motorway

She added: ‘It was probably intact and still useable at that time.

‘The form of this dagger is indistinguishable from Iron Age examples, indicating this simple dagger form had a very long history.’

The archaeological work, which was funded by Transport Scotland, found evidence of iron smelting, bloom refining, and probable blacksmithing, along with a selection of nails.

Dr Gemma Cruickshanks, of National Museums Scotland, said it appeared the dagger was covered in a sheath at the time it was buried (artist’s impression pictured)

Netherton vanished in the 18th Century during improvements to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a well-ordered and symmetrical parkland built in its place. The motorway then subsumed most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement

The settlement was close to the 10th Century Netherton Cross, which is around 1km away from Bothwell Bridge, the scene of the 1679 battle which ended the Covenanter rebellion in Scotland.

Netherton vanished in the 18th Century during improvements to the estate by the Duke of Hamilton, with a well-ordered and symmetrical parkland built in its place.

The motorway then subsumed most of the village with the four stone structures, the last traces of the settlement.

The report said: ‘It is very possible the community was affected by the conflict, either suffering damage to property or as a witness to the route of the Covenanter forces.’

The ‘remarkable’ medieval village and its treasure trove of goods were discovered at Netherton Cross near Bothwell, North Lanarkshire

The Battle of Bothwell Bridge

The Battle of Bothwell Bridge was fought in June 1679 between royalist troops and Presbyterian Covenanters and ended the latter’s rebellion in Scotland.

Following success against the military at the recent Battle of Drumclog, the Convenantors’ support had swollen to 6,000 when they came together at Hamilton.

Differences between Covenanters which had undermined them through the 1650s again created factions among their numbers.

Meanwhile, with 10,000 men and discipline, the Duke of Monmouth, the Earl of Linlithgow and John Graham of Claverhouse mustered by Bothwell Bridge, over the River Clyde.

On 22 June they attacked the disorganised Covenanters and won easily.

Although deaths on the field were few, 200 were killed later.

Of the 1,400 who were captured or surrendered, another 258 were shipwrecked while being transported in The Crown of London.


All Was Lost One Afternoon About 8,000-Years-Ago

Geologists agree that the Storegga tsunami is the largest natural disaster to have happened in the UK in the last 11,000 years. The vast wave was triggered by a series of three submarine landslides in the Norwegian Sea that caused the sinking of Doggerland, the land bridge that linked Britain, Denmark, and the Netherlands.

Representation of the Mesolithic people of Doggerland dealing with rising sea levels. ( Alexander Maleev )

Now the southern North Sea, these rich hunting grounds were a pre-tsunami haven of forests and endless wild beats and resources. This single event had a severe impact on Mesolithic populations at that time, more so than anything else that the universe is known to have thrown at Earth in the last 10,000 years.

What we don’t get in the media presentation of the Storegga tsunami is how the surge might have affected forestry or future agriculture, considering such a dump of minerals and algae. Rather, for example, the BBC headlines with the “Terrible Destructive Tsunami” and we learn Montrose, “which overlooks a tidal lagoon and has a population of 12,000, would have been “completely devastated.”


More Than a Mail Girl

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D06TkslXQAECg9M?format=jpg&name=small

When I first started watching MonsterVision on its opening day on June 29, 1991 (Saturday), there was no host and, of course, no mail girl. This trend went on until Joe Bob Briggs showed up in 1996 and introduced to the audience the lovely Honey as his mail girl. From that moment on, we would see a mail girl, and as the years passed, we would be introduced to a new mail girl. I’m not sure how many there were in total, perhaps three? I’m not sure, but the three I remember were Honey, Reno, and of course Rusty. Every one of these mail girls was great, they did a fantastic job, and I miss them like most of you. It would be great if Joe Bob could somehow bring them on the show. Now, not to get off track, we have a not-so-new mail girl named Darcy.

Diana Prince, known as Darcy, has been the best mail girl by far. No disrespect to the previous mail, girls. But Darcy did what we all wanted. More on this shortly. James Rolfe of Cinemassacre did a tribute video to MonsterVision a little more than ten years ago. A friend sent me the link to the video, and even I wondered what in the hell happened to Joe Bob and can we ever get him back?

I decided to reach out to Joe Bob, and he said it would not work. He had doubts and so forth. I’m sure many of you reading this also asked him to try and find a way to make it back on the screen. We tried like hell, and one day it happened! He’s back! Joe Bob, you magnificent SOB, we told you!

Well, that’s partially correct.

See, while we were clamoring at our keyboards, sending messages to Joe Bob and one another about the good ol’ days and those to come potentially, but likely never will. One lady did what most of us thought was impossible or never would have imagined. Enter Darcy.

Correct me if I am wrong, as I am trying to remember off the top of my head. Still, I believe Darcy heard that Joe Bob was promoting his book Eccentric Orbits: The Iridium Story in San Francisco, and that’s when Darcy dressed up as a mail girl, waited in line with all these individual think tanks, and not only impressed him, but they became friends.
.
That moment was ground zero for the return of the show. By showing up, Darcy had made it clear to Joe Bob that you should be on TV or streaming or whatever, instead of this.

A year later, Joe Bob’s back! He’s on Shudder, he’s on, and that’s all that matters. We see his face for a certain number of weeks and holiday specials, and that’s good (I’d rather it be 52 weeks)!

However, we have to stop and think about Darcy, who got the show off the ground just by showing up and convincing Joe Bob that he is needed.

Darcy has done more than just aid in getting the show up and running. Just from an observational point, I think she keeps Joe Bob running. I believe Darcy has made a tremendous footprint in the horror universe. I think she is one we ought to praise, if not more, because she has also gone out of her way for the fans by putting together the MonsterVision DVD sets that we wait to purchase—a tedious process that will take much time but well worth it.

At first, I was apprehensive about a new mail girl. WHO IS THIS. IMPOSTER. But she is not. She is a genuine lover of the movies we clamor every week to watch together.

You can call her a modern-day Vampira, Elvira, or whatever. I don’t see Darcy as any of those except as Darcy. She is equal to them in name and action, just like Joe Bob. Joe Bob is not a modern-day Svengoolie or Zacherley he’s Joe Bob Briggs!

Well, this article is far too long, but I want to give credit where credit is due. Darcy, you’re a diamond! Thank you for your hard work and patience in getting the production off and running and keeping the Drive-in alive with your presents. I hope you get a horror show to host one day. Maybe it will be called Afterhours with Darcy? Who knows, but you have my support.


Dermot MacMurrough

No doubt the Norman Barons that had conquered England with Duke William, in 1066, would at some time have turned their ambitions onto the lands that lay across the Irish Sea. As it turned out, there was no need for such aggressive action they were invited. It was a decision that the Irish would later regret.

Dermot MacMurrough (c. 1110-1170)

Dermot MacMurrough (or Dermot naNGhall, meaning Dermot, king of the Foreigners) was born in 1110 AD. At the age 16, upon the unexpected death of his older brother (the king of Leinster) he was elected as the new Ui Cinnsealaigh (the ancient name for the Kings of Leinster). This succession, however, did not go down to well with Turlough O’Connor of Connaught, the High King of Ireland, who for whatever reason was opposed to the election.

Turlough’s response was to have far-reaching effects, some of which have remained with us until the present day. Turlough commanded a neighbouring chieftain, Tiernan O’Rourke, a man who had a reputation for his love of battle, to invade the lands of Leinster. Tiernan took to the task with much enthusiasm, but in so doing broke one of the sacred Irish Laws. The Daire’s Law specifically forbade the killing of cattle by an enemy for by doing so, you were forcing starvation on the common people (dairy products were their sole food source), and Tiernan killed the cows of Leinster.

The conflict between Dermot and Tiernan continued for many years and the lands of Leinster were subject to many raids and skirmishes, but finally in 1133 Dermot was able to fully recover his throne after attacking Tiernan’s homelands in Ossory, and sacking the town of Waterford, just like his great-grandfather had done before him. The following two decades were mostly peaceful for Dermot, and he was able to avoid involvement in many of the wars that the other four provinces were waging on one another.

In 1152, war broke out once again when Dermot aided the High King Turlough O’Connor in a raid on Tiernan O’Rourke’s land. Tiernan’s land was destroyed, his armies routed and his cattle killed and burnt. As Dermot was traveling through Meath to return to Leinster, the King of Meath told him that Dervorgilla, Tiernan’s wife and the King of Meath’s sister, wished to run away from her brutal husband. So Dermot turned around and picked up Dervorgilla with all her belonging, before returning home. When Tiernan discovered his wife had been taken, he was furious and vowed revenge. After a year, Dermot was forced to give Dervorgilla back, but Tiernan never forgave Dermot for this abduction and from then on they were the most bitterest of enemies.

Dermot MacMurrough received permission from Henry II to reclaim Leinster.

Tiernan’s revenge came in 1166 when once again the country was ablaze with war. Dermot’s ally, the High King Muirchertach O’Lochlainn, was defeated and Tiernan seizing the opportunity gathered together a number of other chieftains and raided Leinster. Tiernan was out for revenge, the rest for plunder. Vastly outnumbered Dermot barely escaped with his life and in desperation he decided to go to England for help. From Bristol he went to Wales, where he found no shortage of volunteers willing to return with him to Ireland. The Normans, since their conquest in 1066 had taken over Wales from the Celts, and many of these dispossessed Celts, together with a number of willing Norman adventurers welcomed the opportunity to obtain new lands and plunder.

In 1167 Dermot MacMurrough landed in Waterford with a force of Normans and Welsh to be followed later by others, including in 1170 by Strongbow, Richard de Clare, 2nd Earl of Pembroke, whose ancestors had been Lords of Clare in Suffolk. Strongbow was to marry Dermot’s daughter Eva, and when Dermot died of an illness the following year, Strongbow became the new King of Leinster.

The Irish chieftains were no match for Dermot’s new force of mercenaries and within a short space of time he had conquered Ossory, Waterford, and Dublin, and reclaimed the throne of Leinster. Dermot was still not satisfied. He marched on the High King of Ireland, Rory O’Connor (Turlough’s son), and demanded the High King’s submission. Dermot gambled that Rory would not harm the Leinster hostages that the High King held, and these included Dermot’s own son and nephew. For a while Rory hesitated, but then Tiernan, Dermot’s bitter enemy stepped back into the story again. Tiernan convinced Rory to slaughter the hostages and return their bodies to Dermot in a sack like a bullock would be delivered to market. With this Dermot lost the will to fight. His army disbanded and he returned to his capital-Ferns where, a few months later, he died.

I wrote this article some years ago for a another Newsgroup. At the time I could find very little published material available on Anglo-Norman Ireland, but with the help of a number of Web Sites I was able to compose the above from various sites. Sorry, I can not now recall all the sites visited but the text is my own interpretation based on my research.