Portfield DD- 682 - History

Portfield DD- 682 - History


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Porterfield

(DD-682: dp. 2,050; 1. 376'5"; b. 39'7"; dr. 13'9", s. 35 k.;
cpl. 329; a. 5 5", 10 40mm, 10 21" tt.; cl. Fletcher.)

Porterfield (DD-682) was laid down by the Bethlehem Steel Co., San Pedro, Calif. 12 December 1942; launched 13 June 1943; sponsored by Mrs. Louis B. Porterfield; and commissioned 30 October 1943, Comdr. J. C. Woefel in command.

Following her shakedown, Porterfield joined Task Force 53, getting underway 12 January 1944 and arriving off the Marshalls on the 31st. Porterfield's first job was shore bombardment on Ennomennet and Ennubirr Islands, followed by harrassing and neutalizing fire on Roi and Namur.

By 4 February the situation was well in hand, and Porterfield left to convoy several cargo and transport ships to Funafuti. Here she joined three merchantmen and another destroyer, Fletcher, enroute to Majuro. On 20 February Porterfield got underway from Majuro in company with a division of battleships for shore bombardment in the Marshalls. The destroyers screened as the battleships' guns worked over enemy installations thoroughly for two days.

After a quick voyage to Pearl Harbor, Porterfield joined the replenishment group for the fast carrier task force, screening the oilers which refueled the striking forces during the raids on Yap, Palau and Satawan. This duty continued until the end of April, when Porterfield again set course for Pearl Harbor.

Porterfield's next assignment was screening escort carriers during the Marianas invasion. The group sortied from Pearl Harbor 30 June, with Porterfield's group of jeep carriers furnishing air coverage for the advance. The group arrived off Saipan 15 June and enemy air attacks began shortly thereafter. Porterfield stayed with the force, rescuing two pilots, before being sent to Eniwetok 1 July for dry-docking. After her repairs, the ship reached Saipan again 11 July and operated with the carrier screen until sent to Guam early in August.

On 3 August, Porterfield was detached from the carrier group to join the hard hitting carrier Task Force 58/38. She rendezvoused with Task Group 58.4 east of Guam 6 August and operated with that group during the rest of the Guam campaign, returning to Eniwetok for upkeep 10 August.

The group put to sea again 29 August and launched raids against Palau and Mindanao in support of the landings in the Palaus. The ships remained in the general area between the Philippines and the Palaus during all of September, striking at islands within the Philippines.

The carrier force left Ulithi 6 October, with Okinawa and Formosa as their objectives. Air raids were heavier this time

and Porterfield splashed three planes, also rescuing the crew of a torpedo bomber from Hornet. Following the attacks on Okinawa and Formosa, the group was sent to the Philippines, Iying in wait for units of the Japanese Fleet, which were supposed to be planning an attack.

At dawn 25 October the carrier planes from the formation began their strikes against the Japanese forces, crippling the entire group and sending it scurrying back toward Japan. Porterfield was ordered to join four cruisers to finish off the damaged ships. The group engaged one Japanese cruiser which sank just as the destroyers were pressing a torpedo attack.

The group sortied again 1 November for an operating area east of Samar. On the morning of the 5th, the carriers launched a strike against Luzon, amid gathering stormy weather. One pilot from Langley crashed, and had to be hauled aboard Porterfield by a life boat. The Japanese struck back in the early afternoon, and Le~ington took a kamikaze erash. Again Porterfield was undamaged.

On 22 November she again sortied from Ulithi for more raids on Luzon, returning to Ulithi for logistics and upkeep 3 December. A week later she was again underway for Luzon and recovered another Langley pilot on the 13th.

On the group's next raid, it was decided to enter the South China Sea via the Bashi Channel between Formosa and Luzon. Once inside, the group conducted a shipping raid along the China coast which cost the Japanese a heavy toll of their remaining shipping strength.

The group cleared the China Sea 19 January 1945, and again sent planes against Formosa. The Japanese defense was more effective this time, however, as two suicide planes crashed into Ticonderoga and one bomb hit Langley's flight deck. Further strikes were launched against Okinawa Gunto before the group returned to Ulithi 27 January.

On 10 February the ships sortied again, bound for Tokyo and subsequent support of the Iwo Jima landings. On the second day out, Porterfield rescued two pilots from the carrier Cowyens. The fast Carrier Task Force penetrated to within 60 miles of Tokyo without being attacked, and then retired toward Iwo Jima to provide direct support for the landings there. The carrier planes flew direct support missions until 23 February, when the group refueled and set course for Tokyo. During the Iwo Jima campaign Porterfield added another plane to her credit. The group prowled off the Japanese home islands for several days, striking almost at will.

Early on the morning of 26 February, Porterfield picked up a Japanese picket boat on her radar screen, and promptly engaged her. The 150 foot boat put up a stiff fight, aided by rough seas which made fire control difficult, but Porterfield sank her within fifteen minutes.

The following day with the weather steadily improving, the task group refueled and Porterfield departed for Ulithi arriving 1 March. She stayed in Ulithi for three weeks before leaving for Okinawa Jima, where she was to lend fire support for the landings on Kerama Retto and Okinawa.

On 6 April, just as the ships were forming for night retirement, suicide planes swarmed over the formation, diving at any ship which presented a good target. PorterJield shot down one, and was then sent to the aid of destroyers Leutze and Newcomb. The attack was still in full swing when Porterp~eld maneuvered close to the two burning ships, putting over boats to rescue survivors. She then screened the damaged ships to Kerama Retto and transferred the wounded to a hospital ship.

Later that day, Porter}Geld was ordered out with Task Force 54, to intercept units of the Japanese fleet, including the giant battleship Yamato, which were steaming toward Okinawa. The two forces never met, however, as planes of Task Force 58 destroyed the Japanese units. Porterfield then returned to Okinawa, continuing on screening and bombardment duty during which she downed two Japanese planes 10 April.

On the 12th, another heavy air attack materialized. Porterfield, in the leading screen position in her formation, met the attackers, which included about 10 bombers and torpedo planes. With one of her five-ineh guns out of commission, she nevertheless threw up a tremendous amount of highly acourate fire, downing four planes before they could get past her. Four more were brought down as they proceeded over Porterfield to

the heavy units. Two managed to erash into ships, one hitting a destroyer and another smashing into a battleship. Porterfield continued her fine fire support, shooting down another enemy plane before being forced to return to the rear area because of damage to one engine. Upon arriving in Saipan however, the ship was immediately ordered back to Okinawa as a eonvov escort.

Early in May, however, the ship was ordered back to Ulithi where she remained until 20 June, when she got underway for Okinawa, only to find that the engine previously damaged was still inoperative. On 4 July Porterf eld was ordered back to the Puget Sound Navy Yard for an availability. The ship arrived at the Puget Sound Navy Yard 24 July, and was still undergoing repairs when the end of the war was announced. On 27 September she reported to the Pacific Fleet and 3 October got underway for San Diego for decommissioning.

Porterfield recommissioned 27 April 1951 and arrived Pearl Harbor 28 July, steaming for Yokosuka 7 August. Her first Korean assignment was in support of United Nations policies as a part of Task Force 77 off the Korean East Coast where she performed screening and destroyer duties. On 12 December Porterfield joined Task Group 95.11 in the Yellow Sea off the Korean West Coast, and until late December acted as a SGreening unit and plane guard as well as participating in numerous close support patrols.

Porterfield returned to San Diego 8 March 1952, COmmenGing her second far eastern tour 4 October. With Task Force 77 off the Korean East Coast, the ship's duties consisted mainly of screening and plane guarding for the fast carriers, with oeeasional shore bombardments. This was followed by Taiwan patrol duty. She returned to San Diego 6 May 1953.

Porterfield continued to alternate periods of underway training and operations off the California coast with deployments to the western Pacific which took place in 1954, 1955 1956, 1957, and 1958. On the last of these deployments Porterf eld participated in the Taiwan patrol for several weeks eommeneing with the intensifieation of military action from the Chinese mainland against the off-shore islands.

On her eighth western Pacific cruise in 1959 Porterfield operated extensively as a member of a Hunter Killer AntiSubmarine Task Group. She deployed again from November 1960 to April 1961, and from November 1962 to June 1963. Further western Pacific deployments were made in 1964 and 1966' when she worked with amphibious groups off the coast of Vletnam. She remains with the Pacific Fleet into 1970.

Porterfield received ten battle stars for World War II service and four battle stars for Korean War service.


Porterfield History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The surname Porterfield was first found in Renfrewshire, where "in several monasteries, a portion of land was appropriated to the Porter. The descendants of 'John the Porter,' inheriting the 'porterfield' naturally took the surname from their office, until territorial surnames came into fashion, when they lengthened it into 'Robertus Porterfield de eodem,' the founder of a family of consideration in Renfrew" [1]

Of note was John Porterfield of that Ilk who obtained from James III a charter of confirmation of his lands of Porterfield in 1460.

Coat of Arms and Surname History Package

$24.95 $21.20

Early History of the Porterfield family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Porterfield research. Another 169 words (12 lines of text) covering the years 1571, 1571, 1573, 1604, 1549, 1604 and 1571 are included under the topic Early Porterfield History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Unisex Coat of Arms Hooded Sweatshirt

Porterfield Spelling Variations

Spelling variations of this family name include: Porterfield, Porterfeild and others.

Early Notables of the Porterfield family (pre 1700)

More information is included under the topic Early Porterfield Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Porterfield migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Porterfield Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • David Porterfield, who arrived in Virginia in 1684
  • David Porterfield, who arrived in New Jersey in 1685 [2]
Porterfield Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Patrick Porterfield, who arrived in New England in 1749 [2]
  • Boyd Porterfield, who landed in New York in 1776 [2]
  • Boyd Porterfield, who settled in New York in 1776
Porterfield Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • Alexander Porterfield, who settled in New York in 1807
  • Mathew Porterfield, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1823 [2]
  • John Porterfield, who arrived in Mississippi in 1846 [2]
  • Edward Porterfield, who landed in Mississippi in 1854 [2]
  • John, Moses, Robert, Thomas, and William Porterfield, who all, who arrived in Philadelphia between 1813 and 1866

Porterfield migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Porterfield Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century

Porterfield migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Porterfield Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • Isabella Porterfield, aged 21, a servant, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Salisbury" in 1876
  • Rebecca Porterfield, aged 22, a servant, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Salisbury" in 1876
  • Mary E. Porterfield, aged 20, a servant, who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship "Salisbury" in 1876

Contemporary Notables of the name Porterfield (post 1700) +

  • Ian Porterfield (b. 1946), Scottish footballer and coach
  • John Porterfield, American farmer and businessman, eponym of Porterfield, Wisconsin, founded in 1887
  • Edward Porterfield (d. 1948), American flying school instructor who founded the Porterfield Aircraft Corporation, an aircraft design and manufacturing company in 1934 in Kansas
  • Daniel R. Porterfield (b. 1961), American academic, 15th President of Franklin & Marshall College
  • Alfred Porterfield (b. 1869), English professional football goalkeeper
  • Shaletta Tawanna Porterfield (b. 1985), American model, Miss Wisconsin USA (2011)
  • Ron Porterfield, American Major League Baseball athletic trainer
  • Gordon Porterfield, American playwright, novelist, poet and teacher
  • Eugene E. Porterfield (b. 1946), American businessman and politician, Member of the Pennsylvania State Senate (1989 to 1996)
  • Robert Huffard Porterfield (1905-1971), American founder of the Barter Theatre in Austinville, Virginia in 1933 which later became the state theatre of Virginia in 1946 he was artistic director of the theatre until his death in 1971
  • . (Another 13 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Related Stories +

The Porterfield Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Sub pondere sursum
Motto Translation: Beneath my load (I look) upward.


USS Porterfield DD-682

This is a book showing the many activities and the crew of this ship.

Porterfield was a Fletcher class destroyer - a tin can - commissioned in 1943 and decommissioned in 1969.
She fought 10 major World War II battles in the South Pacific followed by earning 4 battle stars in the Korean War.

Porterfield continued to alternate periods of underway training and operations off the California coast with deployments to the western Pacific which took place in 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, and 1958. On the last of these deployments Porterfield participated in the Taiwan patrol for several weeks commencing with the intensification of military action from the Chinese mainland against the off-shore islands.

On her eighth western Pacific cruise in 1959 Porterfield operated extensively as a member of a Hunter Killer AntiSubmarine Task Group. She deployed again from November 1960 to April 1961, and from November 1962 to June 1963. Further western Pacific deployments were made in 1964 and 1966, when she worked with amphibious groups off the coast of Vietnam.


Portfield DD- 682 - History

Displacement: 2924 Tons (Full)
Dimensions: 376Ƌ"(Overall)x 39ƍ"x13"9"(Max)
Armament: 5 x 5"/38AA, 4 x1.1" AA, 4 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" Torpedos (2x5) Lanchers
Machinery: 60,000 SHP Westinghouse Turbines, 2 Screws
Speed: 38 Knots, Range: 6500 NM @ 15 Knots, Crew 273

Operational and Building Data

Laid down by Bethlehem Steel, San Pedro, CA. December 12, 1942
Launched June 12, 1943 and Commissioned October 30, 1943
Decommissioned July 15, 1946
Recommissioned April 27, 1951
Decommissioned November 7, 1969
Stricken March 1, 1975

Designated as a target 1976, sunk July 18, 1982
(somewhere off the coast of Southern California)

Vietnam Era

During her service in VN the 1.1" AA & 20mm AA were gone and replaced with two .50 BMG
mounted aft on the 03 level above what was then the Supply Office and the Lucky Bag.

Porterfield's flag hoist/radio call sign was NKNO and her tactical voice radio call sign was
PIVOT POINT

IMPORTANT NOTE FOR THE CREW OF THE 1966 CRUISE OFF THE COAST OF VIETNAM.

This is a copy of an email I received from the Veteran's Benefits
Administration's Compensation Service dated June 6/6/2013.

Mr. Browning,
Based on your deck log information, I have added the ship as follows:

USS Porterfield (DD-682 [Destroyer] while operating in close coastal waters on March 19, 1966, two officers and a seaman went ashore in a junk and, on April 8, 1966, a small boat went ashore from Da Nang Harbor with Vietnamese officers

This means that Porterfield was added to the list of ships that have a
presumption of herbicide exposure (Agent Orange). You can check
that list of ships on the VA website. We appeared on the July 2013
list. Sorry to have delayed making this entry.


Welcome to the USS Porterfield DD-682 Guestbook Forum

Navy Emporium
Please view our commemorative USS Porterfield DD-682 products in our Ship's Store!

Charles D. Stinar
Years Served: 1959 - 1962
No comment at this time

Jack Kilcrease
Years Served: 1954-1958
Would like to hear from anyone aboard 1954-58

Kenneth Larry Reeves
Years Served: 1960
Made trip from San Diego to Everett, Washington.

Donald D. Stone, STG2
Years Served: 1966-1969
She really was the best of the 2100's

S. Ed Chupp, GM2/cH
Years Served: 1943-1945 @ commissioning &amp shakedown cruise
Proud to have served on this ship.

William Harper
Years Served: 6
I would like to say hello to all my fellow sailors who also served aboard the USS Porterfield.
I have recently retired from the Union Pacific R.R. where I was employed for 34 years. I was a locomotive engineer at the time of my retirement.
I am still married to my wife Sheila, whom I met and married while in the Navy. We were married in San Diego, Ca. shortly after my discharge from the military. We have 3 grown children, and 4 grandchildren.
I am currently living in Torrington, Wy.
I would enjoy hearing from anyone who would be interested in contacting me.
Bill Harper

Lawrence A. Kalakauskis
Years Served: Dec-1957 -Oct.1960
USS PORTERFIELD, DD-682, AFT FIRE ROOM, BOILER TECH. FA, FN, BT3
SHIPPED OVER FOR CLASS B BT SCHOOL,PHIL.PA. MADE E-5 IN 61 AND E6-63, E-7 IN 74, SELECTED FOR E-8 BUT GAVE IOT UP AND RETIRED IN OCT. 77,
FOLLOWING SHIPS / COMMANDS
USS HAVERFIELD DER-393, GUAM, MI.
USS ALFRED A. CUNNINGHAM DD-752, LONG BEACH, CA.
BREMERTO NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON WA. TUG BOAT, YNG-16.
USS NEW JERSEY -BB-62, PHILA. PA. / LONG BEACH CA.
CLASS B/C SCHOOL, PHILA. PA.
USS CONSTELLATION CV-64, SAN DIEGO, CA. / BREMERTON WASH.
134TH. AHS, 1ST. AIR CAV. U.S.A. 1970, HUEY GUN SHIP. VIET NAM
USS TUSCALOSSA LST-1187, SAN DIEGO, CA.
US NAV. STA DATC. SAN DIEGO, CA.
USS SOUTHERLAND DD-743, SAN DIEGO CA.
U.S. NAV ST. SAN DIEGO. CA. RETIREMENT 5 OCT. 1977
SAN DIEGO GAS &amp ELECTRIC CO. POWER PLANT OPERATOR OCT.77-SEPT. 1999, 22 YEARS. MARRIED, 5 KIDS, 8 GRAND AND 2 + 1 GREAT GRAND KIDS.

Dwight Gastineau
Years Served: 1954 - 1958
Living in Puerto Rico now. Would like to hear from anyone that wants to e-mail me

LARRY PATTERSON ET3
Years Served: 1959-1962
I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM ANYONE WHO WAS ABOARD DURING THAT TIME

Richard E. Barth
Years Served: 1958 to 1960
I came aboard as an SKSN and left two years later as an SK2. Was transferred to the Naval Air Station, Anacosta, DC, where a year and a half later they moved out to Andrews Air Force Base for another year and a half. Was transferred back to the west coast for duty on Mine Sweepers. Shore duty took me to the Navy Recuiting Station in Des Moines, Iowa. After that it was back to the west coast with the Inshore Undersea Warfare Group-1 at Long Beach. It was at IUWG-1 that I made E-7. Then it was on to the USS Camden (AOE-2). My last tour of duty was at the Polaris Material Office, Bremerton, WA. I had my retirement papers submitted when I was informed that I could pick up E-8, but I didn't feel like I wanted to go back to sea duty. So I retired with 21 years. It's been 50 years - I'll have so see if I can find an old cruise book and refresh some old memories.

William Teehan
Years Served: 1943-45
My Father, John T. Teehan served on the U.S.S. Porterfield from 1943 to 1945. He passed away in 1993, but some of his final words were that his time on the Porterfield were the best in his life.

Paul Bengtson TM2
Years Served: 1964-65
Cheryl and I highly recommend the Porterfield Reunion Association and the supreme quality of the annual reunions it puts on. We have attended several in recent years. I have wonderful memories of my time on the P-field and my four years in the Navy were some of the best in my entire life. I also served on the USS Dixie AD-14 and the USS Shields DD 596 during my tour of duty. I would love to hear from any of the old shipmates. and that is a true statement for us who were on board then!! God bless you all and your families. Paul Bengtson

bobby payne
Years Served: 1964--1966
hello to all of my shipmates that i have served with during my enlistment. the Porterfield was the greatest experience of my entire service in the navy. if any of you sailors want to contact me at. [email protected] . and if you have any info concerning gerald cockrell or the ships barber before i came along as barber in 1965, as my memory strays from me, frank emilio from the Philadelphia area, and various others that time has caused me to forget there names but not our friendship.

Robert G Smith
Years Served: 1954-1955
Hi I was on the Porterfield in 1954-1955 and was in commissary. I would like to hear from anyone that would remember me

Vance Trube
Years Served: 1958-1960
It would be nice to hear from anyone from the Porterfield during those years. I left the ship in 1960 as a RD2 (They now call this rate an Operations Specialist I think). Along with my duties in CIC I was also the Postman for the ship during my tour on board.

Dick Syslo
Years Served: 1964-1968
Hi shipmates of the USS Porterfield. Would love to hear from you. Have contacted a few I served with. Trying to find more. I was in the After Engine Room. I was in M-Div. I have the 1966 Cruise book for reference pictures,

Stan Campbell
Years Served: 1962-1965
Was Deck Force then went to Commissary

Jim Devin
Years Served: 1968-1969
Served aboard between May 1968 to October 1969. MM3, after engine room.

Donald E. Creel
Years Served: Jan 58-Dec 60
I came onboard from FT school as a FTSA, and was discharged as an FT2. My actual discharge date (minority cruise) was 12-14-60, but was transferred to DESBASE for discharge shortly after Thanksgiving as the ship was scheduled for a WESPAC cruise. I made 2 WESPAC cruises while on the Porterfield. I worked in Aerospace for 9 years, and after layoff worked in security and as a computer programmer, then retired from the Orange County Sheriff's Dept in Calif in 1995, moved to Kansas where I was employed and retired as Chief of Police in a 3 man Police Department in Sedan. My wife of 54 years and I have a home on 80 acres outside of Sedan, where we enjoy(?) mowing about 10 acres of yard weekly during the growing season, watching the deer and other wildlife, and freezing our rear ends off in the winter. Sure miss that California weather!! I would greatly enjoy hearing from any of my old shipmates although I know that we are a rapidly disappearing breed.


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy destroyer DD 682 USS Porterfield embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our DD 682 USS Porterfield embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


Our Newsletter

Product Description

USS Porterfield DD 682

1952 - 1953 Korea Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history. (Most Sailors consider the cruise book one of their most valued treasures)

You would be purchasing the USS Porterfield DD 682 cruise book during the Korean War era. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Full Page Divisional Group Photos with Names
  • Mant Crew Activity Photos
  • Some Ports of Call woth Dates: Japan, Korea, Formosa and Hong Kong
  • Crew Roster with Names and Rank
  • Plus much more

Over 90 photos and the ships story told on 35 pages.

Once you view this CD you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during the Korean War Era.

Additional Bonus:

  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in Navy Ship documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

    If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

    Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

    Check our feedback. Customers who have purchased these CD's have been very pleased with the product.

    Be sure to add us to your !

    Thanks for your Interest!


    Powered by
    The free listing tool. List your items fast and easy and manage your active items.

    This CD is for your personal use only

    Copyright © 2003-2010 Great Naval Images LLC. All rights reserved.


    USS Porterfield DD-682

    This is a book showing the many activities and the crew of this ship.

    Porterfield was a Fletcher class destroyer - a tin can - commissioned in 1943 and decommissioned in 1969.
    She fought 10 major World War II battles in the South Pacific followed by earning 4 battle stars in the Korean War.

    Porterfield continued to alternate periods of underway training and operations off the California coast with deployments to the western Pacific which took place in 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, and 1958. On the last of these deployments Porterfield participated in the Taiwan patrol for several weeks commencing with the intensification of military action from the Chinese mainland against the off-shore islands.

    On her eighth western Pacific cruise in 1959 Porterfield operated extensively as a member of a Hunter Killer AntiSubmarine Task Group. She deployed again from November 1960 to April 1961, and from November 1962 to June 1963. Further western Pacific deployments were made in 1964 and 1966, when she worked with amphibious groups off the coast of Vietnam.


    Portfield DD- 682 - History

    1952 - 1953 Korea Cruise Book (RARE FIND)

    A great part of naval history. (Most Sailors consider the cruise book one of their most valued treasures)

    You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Porterfield DD 682 cruise book during the Korean War era. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    Over 90 photos and the ships story told on 35 pages.

    Once you view this CD you will know what life was on this Destroyer during the Korean War Era.


    Our Newsletter

    Product Description

    USS Porterfield DD 682

    1955 Western Pacific Cruise Book

    Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

    This CD will Exceed your Expectations

    A great part of Naval history.

    You would be purchasing the USS Porterfield DD 682 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

    This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

    Some of the items in this book are as follows:

    • Ports of Call: Western Pacific Ports
    • Departmental Job Descriptions
    • Divisional Group Photos with Names
    • Crew Roster
    • Many Crew Activity Photos
    • Plus Much More

    Over 128 Photos on Approximately 41 Pages.

    Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

    Additional Bonus:

    • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
    • Other Interesting Items Include:
      • The Oath of Enlistment
      • The Sailors Creed
      • Core Values of the United States Navy
      • Military Code of Conduct
      • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
      • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
      • Hunky-Dory and many more.

      Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

      • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
      • Self contained CD no software to load.
      • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
      • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
      • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
      • Viewing options are described in the help section.
      • Bookmark your favorite pages.
      • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
      • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
      • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

      Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

      The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

      If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

      We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.

      If you have any questions please send us an E-mail prior to purchasing.

      Buyer pays shipping and handling. Shipping charges outside the US will vary by location.

      This CD is for your personal use only

      Copyright © 2003-2011 Great Naval Images LLC. All rights reserved.


      Watch the video: A Tour of USS Cassin Young DD-793 Part 4: Weapons Systems