William Linward

William Linward


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William Linward was born in Hull in 1877. Linward played for Doncaster Rovers before joining West Ham United in 1901. He was picked for all 30 games that season. He only scored three goals but made plenty of chances for Billy Grassam, George Radcliffe, Fred Corbett and Fergus Hunt.

Linward joined Woolwich Arsenal and made his debut against Burnley on 27th December 1902. For the remainder of the season he established himself as the club's first choice on the left wing. In the 1903-04 season he played alongside Jimmy Ashcroft, Roderick McEachrane, Tommy Briercliffe, Tommy Shanks, Tim Coleman and Percy Sands in helping Woolwich Arsenal win promotion to the First Division.

Bobby Templeton replaced Linward in the first-team during the 1904-05 season. In 1905 he moved to Norwich City. He also played for Kilmarnock (1906-07) and Maidstone United (1907-08).


Bolton: as good a team as we have played. Who said it, and when?

This is our daily review of Arsenal anniversaries taken from the Arsenal day by day files prepared by the AISA Arsenal History Society.

Here are the stories from this day in history…

20 December 1890 : Arsenal’s game against Old Westminsters in London Senior Cup abandoned. Generally it was the fog that caused games to be stopped rather than any concerns about the state of the pitch.

20 December 1902: Arsenal lost 1-4 to Manchester City the crowd of 25,000 smashed the ground record set on October 11. The defeat left Arsenal in third place with Man City five points ahead at the top of the table.

20 December 1902: William Linward joined Arsenal from WHU. An outside left he made his début on Boxing Day and then on the following day he played again against Burnley – a match which marked a major upturn in Arsenal’s fortunes.

20 December 1924: In a rare success in Knighton’s final season, Leeds were beaten 6-1. The result left Arsenal 10th, but a terrible second half to the season saw them end up 20th, escaping relegation by one place.

20 December 1970. Birth of Patrick Kwame Ampadu. He made his debut as a sub in March 1990, but after just two appearances moved to West Brom in 1991.

20 December 1998: Arsenal 3 Leeds 1 (Vieira, Bergkamp, Petit). From this game to the end of the season Arsenal lost only one game, going the next 19 unbeaten in the league losing finally to Leeds on 11 May.

20 December 2003: Bolton 1 Arsenal 1. The 17th league match of the Unbeaten season. After the game Mr Wenger said, “Provided Bolton keep playing like that, we will look back at this result and feel very happy. They are as good as a team as we have played.”

The latest post from our series on Henry Norris at the Arsenal

Yesterday’s anniversaries:

Special feature:

What’s on the Arsenal History Society site

An index to the various series that contain over 1,700 articles on this site concerning the history of Arsenal appears on our home page.


The Doak Ancestors of David Doak who married Jane Beard

The first surviving records of the Doaks of whom this dissertation discourses are from Chester and Lancaster Counties in Pennsylvania. In 1729, the Governor of Pennsylvania was petitioned by the inhabitants of a portion of Chester County to allow the creation of a new county.  Among the signatories were James Doak, Thomas Mitchell, and two Wilsons.  A copy of the petition may be enlarged and viewed  at this site .

Thomas Mitchell's daughter Jane married Samuel Doak and a Mary, reputedly nee Wilson, married Samuel's brother John Doak.  Of the two Wilson possibles, I think William Wilson was probably my 5x great grandfather.  John and Mary Doak named their youngest son William, and another son was called James Wilson Doak. 

After the petition which created Lancaster County, John and Samuel Doak then both appear in the records as jurors and Samuel as a seller of land in 1739.  There is but the one appearance of James Doak, the only Doak to have signed this petition, and it therefore seems likely that "family lore" among both the Doak and the Mathews families may well be correct and that the initial immigrants were James and Elizabeth Doak and their children.

James and Elizabeth and children had immigrated from Ireland in the 1720s, and the Mathews tradition is that the two families came over on the same boat, or if you prefer, ship, or sailing vessel (which tends to bring to mind a floating teapot!)  Ballynure, County Antrim, was the Mathews' ancestral Ulster base but the Doaks may have been from neighboring Ballyclare, or even its neighbor, Doagh.  (No prizes for guessing how that is pronounced.)

The Doaks were Ulster Scots and staunch Presbyterians, at least in the early American generations, after which moral turpitude allowed Baptists, Methodists, and even the subversion known as Quakerism to take root.  They had clearly been relatively prosperous in Ulster and were probably involved in growing, weaving, and milling flax, activities in which they busied themselves when they reached America.  

In the late 1730s, these Doaks left Pennsylvania and headed south in the great migration to the Shenandoah Valley, where they homesteaded in what would become Augusta County, Virginia. The party comprised David, John, Samuel, Ann, Thankful, and, possibly, Mary. A fourth brother, Robert, is frequently suggested by some, but the first two "sightings" of him, in 1740 and in 1753, have both proved to be cases of mistaken identity, a gentleman named "Robert Poage" thus being twice victimized.  

John and Mary Wilson Doak moved on in 1747 to Lunenburg County, Virginia, and then again, about ten years later, when they settled in Rowan County, North Carolina.

Samuel and Jane Mitchell Doak remained in Augusta County, Virginia, where they raised, among others, a son named Samuel (1749-1830), who after "praying so hard that the battle was won" at King's Mountain devoted himself to preaching, educating, and disputing.

David Doak, whose first wife is reputed to have been Mary Breckenridge, moved to property which had-- or could have had-- one of my favorite addresses:

Doak's Mill & Mill Run, Black Buffalo Lick, Old Orange/Augusta/Botetourt/Fincastle/Montgomery/Wythe County, Virginia.  (So much more poetic than a zipcode, don't you think?) This property was purchased in 1768 from John and Mary McFarland of Bedford County, Virginia and Robert and Martha McFarland of Orange County, North Carolina. It is a grim irony that one of David's sons, William, is believed to have killed a Joseph McFarlane in a duel, but it is not certain Joseph was a son of the vendors of 1768, although clear enough he had been a "damn Tory".

Pictured is the gravestone of David and Mary Doak.  Credit is due to  Mary B. Kegley and Janie Dillon of Wythe County, Virginia, and for the photograph itself to J. Linward Doak of Kentucky.  Click on the image to enlarge. The inscription reads:   

Stone of David (1710-1787) and Polly (Mary) Doak (d 1826

Among the fourteen children named in David's Doak's 1787 will were William, who was baptized in November 1747 at North Mountain in Augusta County, and Samuel, who was younger, but how much younger remains unclear.  Both William and Samuel and their brother David served in Lord Dunmore's War in the Fincastle County militia company of Captain Robert Doak.  Robert seems much more like a son than a brother of David (1710-1787) now that Mr. Poage's reputation is clear from the slander of having impersonated as a Doak in 1740 and 1753 records.

William Doak, who was  at King's Mountain and perhaps also at  the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, was granted bounty land in what was then North Carolina and settled in what became Knox County, Tennessee.  He was followed a few years later in 1789 by Samuel, who fled the jurisdiction of Virginia, perhaps under suspicion of sowing turnips sideways.  Samuel operated a ferry across the Holston River and, following a few homeless years from 1797 onward, died in 1813 in Davidson County, Tennessee.  It is Samuel Doak and his wife Annas (Agnes) who are now believed to have been the parents of David Doak, the husband of Jane Beard. Both families would have lived in Knox County during the same years, before David Doak and his father in law Samuel Beard's extended family all wound up on lands in Adair County, Kentucky on the 1801 Tax List there.

NOTE:  For those who wish to delve even further into the Doak history and possible immigrant ancestors, read  the link "The Identity Crisis of Immigrant Patriarch Doak" .


Photos: Step inside the majestic Lynnewood Hall

Lynnewood Hall, the 110-room mansion by Horace Trumbauer, is a lesson in opulence. Photos by Austin H.

Editor's Note: This post was originally published in July 2014 and has been updated with the most recent information.

We have something special for you today. Austin H.—you know him as @AustinXC04 on Instagram—took these interior shots of Lynnewood Hall in 2013 and graciously allowed us to share them with you.

There were a variety of responses when we brought you the news that Lynnewood Hall in Elkins Park was now for sale for $20 million. (Since listing, it’s been on and off the market with a last reported $16.5 million price tag.) Most of you were stunned, and lamented that Horace Trumbauer's Gilded Age masterpiece had been left in such a sorry state for all of these years. Others pondered the hefty price tag and potential development options for the 33-acre site.

Courtesy of the Library of Congress

Earlier photos of Lynnewood Hall, the 110-room mansion designed by Horace Trumbauer for street-car magnate P.A.B. Widener to house his growing family and art collection.

The vast majority of you, however, mentioned that it was a shame that you had never gotten to see inside the massive mansion, which Trumbauer designed in the late 1890s for street-car magnate P.A.B. Widener to house his growing family and art collection. You had let your imagination run wild through the years, dreaming of its majestic interior during lavish parties and celebrations, French tapestries, and nearly unrivaled art collection while you peered at the derelict mansion through its weathered gates.

Yes, while the mansion’s exterior is a far cry from its hey day, these photos show that its interiors are still awe-inducing. We beg of you, take a moment, examine each photo carefully and you'll still see many fine workings of master craftsmen of a bygone era and the bones of an estate that— at one time—had it all.


1901-02 Southern League : First Division

The directors of West Ham were pleased to discover that the sale of season tickets had doubled to 110. To improve the financial situation 500 additional shares of stock were sold.

West Ham lost several of their best players at the end of the 1900-1901 season. James Reid left for Worksop Town whereas Freddie Fenton joined Swindon Town. The biggest blow of all was the club's longest-serving player, Charlie Dove, leaving for bitter rivals, Millwall.

However, at the beginning of the 1901-02 the Football League introduced a maximum wage of £4 per week. As some players had been earning as much as £10, they decided to join Southern League clubs where there were no restrictions on wages. As John Harding pointed out in For the Good of the Game: The Official History of the Professional Footballers' Association (1991) "In effect, the Football League abolished the free market where players' wages and conditions were concerned. there were 'escape routes' to clubs and countries where a player could ply his trade freely and earn a reasonable (indeed, where some Southern League clubs were concerned, highly lucrative) wage."

Minutes of Board Meeting December 1901

16 December 1901: Transfer of Alex McDonald from Southampton £20 fee

Text and Match extracts from the excellent book "IRONS of the SOUTH West Ham United in the Southern League"

By kind permission of author JOHN POWLES and published by Soccer Data

WELLINGBOROUGH TOWN : Southern League

78 minutes bad light : rearranged for 30 September 1901

BRISTOL ROVERS : Southern League

BRENTFORD : Southern League

Monteith, King, Craig, Bigden, Kelly, McEachrane, Allan, Grassam, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward

NEW BROMPTON : Southern League

Monteith, King, Craig, Bigden, Kelly, McEachrane, Allan, Grassam, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward

KETTERING TOWN : Southern League

Monteith, King, Craig, Bigden, Kelly, McEachrane, Allan, Grassam, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward

WELLINGBOROUGH TOWN : Southern League

Monteith, King, Craig, Bigden, Kelly, McEachrane, Allan, Grassam, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward

There were new additions to the squad as the second season got under way. Jimmy Bigden, a half-back, came from Gravesend together with Bill Linward, a winger from Doncaster Rovers. For this campaign the club decided that, in addition to their Southern League fixtures, they would also enter the Western League and London League. The team made a positive start and by the end of September they were leading the Southern League courtesy of four wins and a draw. Included in those games was a victory against Brentford, who were beaten 2–0 with Billy Grassam scoring both goals. Also among the goals was Freddie Corbett with a hat-trick against Wellingborough in a 4–2 win. There were four goals scored against both Northampton and Luton but what followed next was a disappointing run of six defeats with only one goal scored. Due to an administrative error, the team had to fulfil an FA Cup tie against Leyton on the same day as they were due to play Tottenham in a league match. To resolve this, the reserve team were sent to Leyton, where they won 1–0, and the first team entertained Tottenham. Before a crowd of 17,000 the Hammers lost 1–0 to their London rivals.

A home tie in the FA Cup followed against local side Grays United, ending in a giant-killing as the village team won 2–1. The side was inconsistent – during December and January there was a run of three games without a win followed by three straight victories. However, this all changed as the team remained unbeaten during the last two months of the campaign. Fergus Hunt scored twice against Luton and got two more in the 4–0 defeat of Queens Park Rangers. Fellow striker George Ratcliffe also hit form as he scored nine goals in the last ten games including two against both Watford and Queens Park Rangers. There was an excellent 2–1 victory at Tottenham, where goalkeeper Hugh Monteith was the star performer. The backbone of the side had been four Scots: forward Billy Grassam, half-back Rod McEachrane, full-back Charlie Craig and goalkeeper Hugh Monteith. It had been a good campaign with the team finishing in fourth position in the Southern League but off the field the club struggled with their finances.

Manager: Committee members responsible for team selection

The opening fixture of the season was scheduled for Monday 2 September with a kick off at 6.30 pm. Unfortunately due to the late arrival of visitors Wellingborough, the match did not get under way until ten minutes to seven. Due to the bad light later on the referee had to abandon the game with twelve minutes left to play. Fortunately neither team held an advantage at the time, as the score was 1-1. There was some relief for two of the players when the whistle blew, as both goals were of the 'own goal' variety. The match did have one unhappy outcome however, as Fergus Hunt received a serious knee injury in the second half which put the ex-Woolwich Arsenal man out of action for a couple of months.

VIVIAN GIBBINS (1923-1932) Born this day Forest Gate, London

As an amateur, he appeared in the line-up as "V.W.T. Gibbins," to distinguish him from the pros who were not then given Christian names in programme details. Like that other great West Ham United and England amateur international before him - Harry Stapley - Viv was a schoolmaster by profession and also a centre-forward for club and country. The last of the great amateurs imbued with the Corinthian spirit to serve the club, he became the first from the non-paid ranks since WW1 to head a League Club's scoring lists by topping Hammers' goalscoring charts with 18 goals in 1930-31. Making his debut against Nottingham Forest in a 1-2 reverse at the City Ground on the 15 December 1923, Viv found the pace of First Division soccer somewhat faster than that which he had experienced previously with local amateurs Clapton F.C. His pen-picture in a 1925-26 Club Handbook gives some idea of the esteem in which he was held at the Boleyn: "The name of Gibbins is a household word in London Football, and it is our great regret that he cannot assist us regularly, for we would always find a place for him." The writer of those notes must have been happy when Vivian decided to play permanently for West Ham United in 1927-28 while still retaining his amateur status, but not so pleased when his transferred to Brentford on 19 February 1932. Honours England amateur caps v. Ireland and South Africa (1925) Ireland and Scotland (1927) Ireland and Scotland (1930) and Wales and Scotland (1931).

JAMES BIGDEN and WILLIAM LINWARD both make their debuts against BRISTOL ROVERS

The home side had been beaten only once in the previous season on their own ground, and it came as a surprise and a disappointment to their followers that West Ham inflicted defeat so early in the campaign. Grassam and Corbett scored in a 2-0 result where the visitors were smarter in front of goal. One excuse offered by the West Country men was that the team played in jerseys that were too hot for them!

When Brentford came to Canning Town for a Southern League fixture the weather was warm and sunny: ideal for the assembled crowd, but possibly too warm for the players. When West Ham took the field they were wearing their new colours for the first time - light blue jerseys, with a claret band, and white knickers with a red stripe, and it was said they looked very conspicuous in the new outfits. The attendance was 4,500, with the visitors bringing a large contingent of 800 supporters with them. They were to go home disappointed as the 'Irons' were certainly too hot for the 'Bees', winning a one sided game by two goals to nil, with Grassam responsible for both goals yet again.

The match at Preistfield Stadium was played out in showery weather before 4,000 spectators. The play was very even in the first-half with neither side managing to find the net. The second period continued in much the same vain but the longer the play went on the hotly contested match was starting to turn in favour of the home side with Brompton having slightly better of the exchanges. However, the defence on both sides prevailed throughout and a very fast game ended in a goalless draw.

Just one goal was enough to inflict defeat on Kettering when they came to town. The visitors were criticised for some rough and vicious play after they had gone behind in the final fifteen minutes of the game. The referee went so far as to call the whole 'Ketts' side together to warn them about their behaviour. Aside from the two points gained the West Ham executive were more than pleased with the 'gate' of 6,000 on the day.

With the original fixture abandoned on 78 minutes due to bad light and to avoid any possibility of a further abandonment the match began at a little after 3.30pm, and consequently the attendance was only 2,000. Fred Corbett had not been performing well in the previous two Southern League matches and quite probably would have been replaced by Peter Kyle. Maybe with that thought in mind, Fred was at his best, scoring a hat-trick in a 4-2 victory. The 'Irons' were now undefeated in five matches and went to the top of the table.

The Hammers' position at the top of the table was maintained in an exciting tussle at the City Ground against Northampton where the claret and blue side overcame the home side by 4 goals to 3.

WILLIAM SMITH (1928-1929) Born this day Corsham, Wiltshire

A West Countryman, full-back William Smith has often been confused over the years with a colleague and namesake Harry Smith, an inside-forward who played for Hammers at around the same time. Played as an amateur for Corsham F.C. in the Wiltshire League before joining Southern League Bath City (still as a member of the non-paid ranks) for a season-and-a-half. He then signed professional forms for Notts County and spent four years on the Trentside until his transfer to West Ham in 1927. Made his Hammers debut in the 2-5 away defeat by Huddersfield Town on the 7 January 1928. Smith's only other appearance was a year and 12 days later, again a 2-5 defeat, this time against Aston Villa at Villa Park.

alt="SMITH William" />

Monteith, King, Craig, Allan, Kelly, McEachrane, Grassam, Hunt, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward

NORTHAMPTON TOWN : Southern League

4 - 3 (Grassam 2, McEachrane, Bennett [og])

Monteith, King, Craig, Bigden, Kelly, McEachrane, Allan, Grassam, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward

LUTON TOWN : Southern League

Monteith, King, Craig, Bigden, Kelly, McEachrane, Allan, Grassam, Corbett, Ratcliffe, Linward


Arsenal players must not criticise refs: but everyone else can

Below are the Arsenal (and for historical context, occasionally one or two non-Arsenal) anniversaries for today taken from the files of over 6000 Arsenal anniversaries which appear on the Arsenal History Society website. You will also find links to the month by month listing of anniversaries in the right hand column of this page.

Our headline comes from 1975.

“Henry Norris at the Arsenal” is now complete. The index to all the articles can be found at Henry Norris at the Arsenal. We are now preparing a more concise edition for publication as a book.

Arsenal in the 1930s: the complete history. The most detailed review and analysis of Arsenal in the 1930s ever published. The full index is here.

Arsenal in the 1970s: the complete history. Every game reviewed and analysed. The full index is here.

The Anniversaries for Today

20 December 1890 : Arsenal’s game against Old Westminsters in London Senior Cup abandoned. Generally it was the fog that caused games at this time to be stopped rather than any concerns about the state of the pitch.

20 December 1902: Arsenal lost 1-4 to Manchester City the crowd of 25,000 smashed the ground record set on October 11. The defeat left Arsenal in third place with Man City five points ahead at the top of the table.

20 December 1902: William Linward joined Arsenal from WHU. An outside left he made his début on Boxing Day and then on the following day he played again against Burnley – a match which marked a major upturn in Arsenal’s fortunes.

20 December 1913: Arsenal began the traditional mad dash through Christmas, with four matches in eight days. All four games were won: on this day it was Arsenal 2 Glossop North End 0 with 14,500 at Highbury.

20 December 1916: As a reminder of the many generally unreported consequences of the war, Fulham council under Henry Norris was at loggerheads on this day over the collapse of the refuse collection and disposal service in the Borough with many refuse collectors now in the army.

20 December 1919: Arsenal beat bottom of the league Sheffield Wednesday 3-1 The reports mention the a large number of offside decisions, (a regular comment in newspaper columns) and ultimately the tactic led to the change in the offside rule in 1925. It was also announced that George Peachey was to be made a director of the club to handle the club’s finances.

20 December 1924: Leeds were beaten 6-1. The result left Arsenal 10th, but a terrible second half to the season saw them end up 20th, escaping relegation by one place.

20 December 1924: WHU 4 Sunderland 1. In his autobiography Arsenal manager Knighton painted WHU as the strongest of clubs at this time. But this win, simultaneous to Arsenal’s win (above) was one of only four wins in 12. However he used WHU’s alleged strength as a way to justify giving the Arsenal team drugs the following month.

20 December 1930: 32,212 saw Arsenal lose to 17th placed Newcastle after Newcastle had lost 8 out of 10 games of late. The result knocked Arsenal off the top of the league and into second place – but only on a goal average of 0.01 of a goal.

20 December 1969: Start of a run of 10 league games without a win. Indeed we only won two of our first eight games, starting the season ignominiously with a 0-1 home defeat to Everton. Top scorer that season was Radford with 12.

20 December 1970. Birth of Patrick Kwame Ampadu. He made his debut as a sub in March 1990, but after just two appearances moved to West Brom in 1991.

20 December 1975: 16,459 saw Arsenal beat Burnley 1-0 at Highbury. Burnley accused the ref of making “disgraceful decisions” and Keith Newton was quoted as saying, “The ref was a blatant homer…People like them should go around in peaked caps – they are more suited as traffic wardens. We are supposed to have the best refs in the world – I have seen better refereeing in the central league.” The League did nothing about the accusations of bias and incompetence.

20 December 1998: Arsenal 3 Leeds 1 (Vieira, Bergkamp, Petit). From this game to the end of the season Arsenal lost only one game, going the next 19 unbeaten in the league losing finally to Leeds on 11 May.

20 December 2003: Bolton 1 Arsenal 1. The 17th league match of the Unbeaten season. After the game Mr Wenger said, “Provided Bolton keep playing like that, we will look back at this result and feel very happy. They are as good as a team as we have played.”


William Linward - History

This was the most popular song of the French Revolution. The translation is mine, and rough! This is my suggested *loose* translation. I have not tried to preserve metre or rhyme, but have tried to preserve meaning, [Ça ira, literally means "that will go (well)"!] Suggestions taken.

Note especially the attitude taken to the aristocracy and the clergy.

[Thanks to William w. Kibler" [email protected] for correction of the accents in the original posted version.]

Click here for a Real Audio file of Ça ira

[Note: Although real audio files are capable of being "streamed" over the net, that is not possible from the server I am using on this page (that may change). But even as downloadables, they are much smaller than AU and WAV files. You will need a Real Audio player installed to play them. It is from from the Real Audio Website. ]

Nos ennemis confus en restent là,
et nous allons chanter Alleluya!
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Quand Boileau jadis du clergé parla
Comme un prophète, il a prédit cela,
En chantant ma chansonnette,
Avec plaisir on dira:
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Malgré les mutins tout réussira.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Pierrot et Margot chantent à la guinguette,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Réjouissons-nous, le bon temps viendra.
Le peuple français jadis "a quia"
L'aristocratie dit: "Mea culpa."
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

e clergé regrette le bien qu'il a.
Par justice la nation l'aura,
Par le prudent LaFayette
Tout trouble s'apaisera,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Malgré les mutins tout réussira.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Petits comme grands sont soldats
dans l'âme,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Pendant la guerre aucun ne trahira.
Avec coeur tout bon Français combattra,
S'il voit du louche, hardiment
il parlera.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Lafayette dit: "Vienne qui voudra."
Le patriotisme leur répondra
Sans craindre ni feu ni flamme,
Les Français toujours vaincront,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Malgré les mutins tout réussira.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Les aristocrates à la lanterne!
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Les aristocrates, on les pendra!
Le despotisme expirera,
La liberté triomphera,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Nous n'avions plus ni nobles, ni prêtres,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,
L'égalité partout régnera.
L'esclave autrichien le suivra,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira,

Et leur infernale clique
Au diable s'envolera.

"We will win, we will win, we will win",
The people of this day neverendingly sing
"We will win, we will win, we will win,
In spite of the traitors, all will succeed"

Our confused enemies are staying low
But we are going to sing "Alleluia!"
"We will win, we will win, we will win",

When Boileau once spoke about the clergy
"Like a prophet he predicted as much.,
By singing my ditty,
With pleasure I will say:
"We will win, we will win, we will win,

In spite of the traitors, all will succeed"
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

Punch and Judy sing at the show
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

Let us rejoices, for the good times are coming
The French people were once nobodies
But now the aristocrats say "we are guilty"
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

The clergy now regrets all its wealth .
Through justice the nation will have it all,
Through the wise LaFayette
All trouble will be quieted,
"We will win, we will win, we will win,

In spite of the traitors, all will succeed"
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

The weak as well as the strong are soldiers
in their souls
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

During the war, not one will be a traitor.
With their hearts, all good Frenchmen will fight,
And when he sees a slacker,
he will boldly speak up
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

Lafayette says, "Let he who will follow me!"
And patriotism will respond,
Without fear of fire or flame.
The French will always conquer
"We will win, we will win, we will win,

In spite of the traitors, all will succeed"
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

Let's string up the aristocrats on the lampposts!
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

We'll string up the aristocrats!
Despotism will die,
Liberty will triumph
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

And we will no longer have nobles or priests
"We will win, we will win, we will win,""
Equality will reign throughout the land/world
And the Austrian slave will follow it.
"We will win, we will win, we will win,"

And their hellish clique
will be sent to the devil.


Translation: Paul Halsall, 1998, with suggested corrections from William W. Kibler,
Superior Oil - Linward Shivers Professor of French University of Texas at Austin (who also corrected the accents in the French!.)

Additional Words:

Prof. Kibler informed me that, on an audiotape called Songs of the French Revolution, the text has the following variants:

These lines are slightly different:

15. Pierrette et Margot chantent.
22. Et c'est justice, la nation l'aura
24. C'est fini, tout trouble s'apaisera

After line 27, here the CD version goes:

Suivant la maxime de l'Evangile,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira
Du législateur tout s'accomplira.
Celui qui s'élève on l'abaissera
Celui qui s'abaisse on l'élévera.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira!

Le vrai catéchisme nous instruira
Et le faux fanatisme s'éteindra
Pour être à la loi docile
Et chaque Français s'exercera
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira.

Malgré les mutins, tout réussira.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira.

Le peuple en ce jour sans cesse répète
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira
Et dans 2000 ans on s'en souviendra,
Le despotisme expirera
La liberté triomphera.
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira.

Nous n'avons plus ni nobles, ni prêtres,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira.
L'égalité partout règnera.
L'esclave autrichien le suivra,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira.
Et leur infernale clique
Au diable s'envolera.

Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira
Les aristocrates à la lanterne,
Ah! ça ira, ça ira, ça ira
Les aristocrates, on les pendra.

Bibliography/Discography Suggestions

I cannot locate a CD or tape currently available called Songs of the French Revolution, but there is a CD called Prise De La Bastille/Music of the French Revolution, by the Concerto Köln, Capriccio - #10280, 1992, which may be useful to those searching for more music related to this subject, although it feature classical rather than popular music of the period.]

On the Maillsit [email protected] on December 17 1996, Louis Godbout [[email protected] ] posted the following useful information about further research:

You could spend a lifetime - as some have - researching this subject. Both the Bibliotheque Nationale and the British Library have vast collections of documents on the French Revolution that include an astronomical number of songs (as well as satirical pamphlets that include songs). Catalogs of these materials exist, if you are interested.

If, however, you just want to take a cursory look at the most popular
of these songs, you can still purchase the Chansonnier revolutionnaire, an anthology published by Gallimard in 1989 (for the bicentennial).

Any respectable college library should hold a few books on this subject. Here are a few that I have consulted and found useful (Raunie is an especially good anthology, but stops at 1789 you can purchase an academic press reprint if you have a few thousand dollars to spare.):

Histoire de France par les chansons : s'ensuivent 306 belles chansons satiriques et historiques, Paris : M. Fourny, 1982.
DESCRIPTION: 300 p. of music : ill. (some col.), facsims., ports. 32 cm. + 4 sound discs (33 1/3 rpm, stereo 12 in.)

Les Hymnes et chansons de la revolution : apercu general et catalogue avec notices historiques, analytiques et bibliographiques, Paris, Imprimerie nationale, 1904.

Music and the French Revolution, Cambridge New York : Cambridge University Press, 1992.

Raunie, Emile, 1854-1911.Chansonnier historique du XVIIIe siecle, Paris, A Quantin, 1879-84.

Rogers, Cornwell Burnham, 1898-, The spirit of revolution in 1789 : a study of public opinion as revealed in political songs and other popular literature at the beginning of the French revolution. Princeton, Princeton Univ. Press, 1949.

This text is part of the Internet Modern History Sourcebook. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts for introductory level classes in modern European and World history.

Unless otherwise indicated the specific electronic form of the document is copyright. Permission is granted for electronic copying, distribution in print form for educational purposes and personal use. If you do reduplicate the document, indicate the source. No permission is granted for commercial use of the Sourcebook.

© Paul Halsall April1998, updated November 1998

The Internet History Sourcebooks Project is located at the History Department of Fordham University, New York. The Internet Medieval Sourcebook, and other medieval components of the project, are located at the Fordham University Center for Medieval Studies.The IHSP recognizes the contribution of Fordham University, the Fordham University History Department, and the Fordham Center for Medieval Studies in providing web space and server support for the project. The IHSP is a project independent of Fordham University. Although the IHSP seeks to follow all applicable copyright law, Fordham University is not the institutional owner, and is not liable as the result of any legal action.

© Site Concept and Design: Paul Halsall created 26 Jan 1996: latest revision 20 January 2021 [CV]


'One Plainfield, one future'

There is an interesting piece of trivia about the week that changed Plainfield.

According to Hetfield, who's a music teacher in Delaware, two singles by two groups with roots in Plainfield &mdash one black and one white &mdash had songs on the national record charts that week. The white group was The Critters with "Don't let the Rain Fall Down on Me," while George Clinton's group, The Parliaments, was on the charts with "I Want to Testify." Clinton worked at a barber shop, called at different times the Tonsorial Parlor and The Silk Palace, that was near ground zero of the unrest.

Chances are that literal and metaphorical harmony will never again be achieved in Plainfield. But the city, 50 years later and in a new century, appears to be poised for a fresh start.

That may be one of the reasons why no formal commemorations are planned to mark the 50th anniversary of the unrest. Last October, a program, &ldquoThe Plainfield Rebellion: 50 years later, a Retrospective&rdquo was held at Washington School as part of the Plainfield Frontiers International&rsquos Westry Horne Cultural and Heritage Series.

In an article published on the 40th anniversary of the riots, Dreier wrote that his classmates attending a reunion hardly discussed the riots. With few exceptions, photos of the reunion, Dreier said, showed that blacks and whites sat at separate tables. "Forty years later, and, still, two separate worlds," he concluded.

"A lot of people are not aware of what happened," Muhammed said, adding that 50 years ago Plainfield was in the spotlight of national attention and was mentioned "in the same breath" as Watts and Detroit.

It's still important to look back and see what caused the unrest, he said, but it's more important to concentrate on the future. "Backwards Never, Forward Ever" is one of his mantras.

The risk in remembering what happened 50 years in Plainfield and the rest of the country is that it may tear the scab off a wound that many think is still open.

The outrage over police brutality, as evidenced by the reaction to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and other police shootings, speaks to the belief that blacks are still subject to unequal treatment.

"Black people are still getting the short end of the stick," said East End resident Elizabeth Faraone, who started the Witnesses to the Plainfield Insurrection of 1967 page on Facebook. "This country is not safe for black people and never has been."

Another example of the unequal treatment, Faraone said, "Muhlenberg Hospital was stolen from this community."

Though there are redevelopment projects near the Raritan Valley Line, Muhammed's "biggest fear" is that city residents may be "left out of the process."

He also said that local contractors should have access to the work. Muhammed has a new hashtag, BUILD &mdash Being United and Involved in Local Development.

Mapp realizes that residents should not be left out of redevelopment. "It's important that our current residents are afforded the opportunity to take advantage of these new living spaces," he said. "We are mindful of that balance as we move ahead with our redevelopment projects."

And there are still too many young men in Plainfield who are "under-educated and under-employed" who need job training so they can have the opportunity to find well-paying jobs, Muhammed said.

Young men, who may have gotten into trouble, also need assistance in their "re-entry into the community," Muhammed said.

Assemblyman Jerry Green, who moved to Plainfield 40 years ago, has sponsored legislation to shorten the time to expunge a criminal record and to eliminate questions about criminal records from the initial employment application.

Green said the key to ensuring Plainfield's future is by making an investment in human capital through education that will pay dividends for decades.

His top priority is to make sure that Plainfield receives enough state aid for its public school system. With the city's changing population &mdash 40 percent of the population speaks Spanish at home &mdash "the bottom line is that the students need our help."

"We have to give people the opportunity to get good, high-paying jobs," Green said.

To revitalize the West End, economic conditions must improve. That's one of the reasons why the minimum wage should be raised, Green said.

The government can help by awarding incentives and encouraging companies to locate in the West End, he said. At one time, Plainfield was the center of shopping in Central Jersey now, he said, even Plainfield residents leave town to shop either along the Route 22 corridor in Watchung and North Plainfield or the Interstate 287 corridor in Piscataway and South Plainfield.

Relations between the community and the police department have improved, but there is still "room for improvement," Muhammed said.

Community policing is important but just as important is hiring officers from the community.

"Officers should know the name of every family on their beat," he said.

Mapp agreed that progress has been made.

"Confidence in our police force has increased dramatically," Mapp said," and the morale of the force itself is higher than it has been for a long time."

Officers have been told to walk through neighborhoods every day and interact with residents, the mayor said. Since officers started wearing body cameras, there has been a 50 percent drop in complaints against officers. Though there have been high-profile cases, the city''s overall crime rate has fallen.

The mayor added that it is a priority to recruit new officers from the city because "the officers have a vested interest in being fair."

"We have finally realized we all have to work together and put community first," Green said. "We will no longer fight over power, we will fight for what is good for the city."

Mapp also realizes that it's essential for Plainfield to move forward together.

"Meaningful and actionable discourse is sometimes all that's needed to come to a reasonable solution and find answers that will satisfy all," the mayor said.

That spirit of unity is an echo of something that was said a half century ago.

In an open letter to the community shortly after her husband's death, Mrs. John Gleason asked for healing. "I fervently hope we may work together to bring dignity back to our town and to make it a safe and happy place."

Staff Writer Mike Deak: 908-243-6607 [email protected]


William Linward - History

Frank L. BATTARD [Parents] was born on 21 Jun 1884. He died on 2 Jun 1995. Frank married Lea BERTHELOT.

Frank was also known as Frank Battard. He died before 20 Apr 2005.

Lea BERTHELOT [Parents] was born on 26 Oct 1889 in Ascension Parish, LA. She died on 17 Apr 1952. Lea married Frank L. BATTARD.

Lea was also known as Leah Berthelot. She died before 20 Apr 2005.

They had the following children.

Albert Joseph POCHE was born on 12 Jul 1884. He died on 15 Jun 1959. Albert married Marie Emilie BATTARD.

Marie Emilie BATTARD [Parents] was born on 6 Aug 1889. She died on 4 Jul 1927 in Lions, LA. Marie married Albert Joseph POCHE.

Jacques (Jack) VICKNAIR [Parents] was born on 23 Aug 1913 in Reserve, LA. He died on 26 Oct 1976. He was buried on 28 Oct 1976 in St. Peter Cemetery, Reserve, LA. Jacques married Marie Rita BATTARD on 17 May 1947.

Marie Rita BATTARD [Parents] was born on 22 Jan 1924 in Reserve, LA. She died on 25 Jul 1995. Marie married Jacques (Jack) VICKNAIR on 17 May 1947.

They had the following children.

Francois Nicolas KELLER [Parents] was born on 4 Apr 1821 in St. James Parish, LA. Francois married Marie Agnes BAUDET on 25 Apr 1842 in St. Michael Church, Convent, LA.

Marie Agnes BAUDET. Marie married Francois Nicolas KELLER on 25 Apr 1842 in St. Michael Church, Convent, LA.

Jean Baptiste KELLER [Parents] was born on 4 Mar 1817 in St. James Parish, LA. Jean married Marie Celestine BAUDET on 12 May 1838 in St. Michael Church, Convent, LA.

Marie Celestine BAUDET. Marie married Jean Baptiste KELLER on 12 May 1838 in St. Michael Church, Convent, LA.

Antoine Silvain TREGRE III [Parents] was born on 1 Sep 1791 in German Coast. He died on 5 Jun 1823. Antoine married Delphine BAUDOIN on 29 Jan 1816 in St. James Church St. James, LA.

Delphine BAUDOIN. Delphine married Antoine Silvain TREGRE III on 29 Jan 1816 in St. James Church St. James, LA.

They had the following children.

Jean Pierre FOLSE [Parents] was born about 1771. He died in Oct 1841. Jean married Helene BAUDOIN after 22 May 1804.

Helene BAUDOIN. Helene married Jean Pierre FOLSE after 22 May 1804.

Severin FOLSE [Parents] was born on 24 Nov 1809. Severin married Marguerite BAUDOIN on 28 Oct 1828.

Marguerite BAUDOIN. Marguerite married Severin FOLSE on 28 Oct 1828.

Charles MADERE Jr. [Parents] was born on 24 Jan 1833 in St. John Parish, LA. He died on 14 Feb 1886. Charles married Marie Notesia BAUDOIN on 22 Jun 1854 in St. Charles Parish, LA.

Marie Notesia BAUDOIN [Parents] was born in 1840 in St. Charles Parish. She died on 25 Jan 1917 in Hahnville, LA. Marie married Charles MADERE Jr. on 22 Jun 1854 in St. Charles Parish, LA.


The Lancelot-Grail Cycle : Text and Transformations

"The Lancelot-Grail Cycle is a seminal work in the development of the European medieval literatures right down to the Renaissance. For this reason, this volume will be compulsory reading for a wide audience interested in medieval matters, history, linguistics and belles lettres, and literary criticism."
--Carol R. Dover, assistant professor of French, Georgetown University

Composed in Old French between about 1220 and 1240, the Lancelot-Grail Cycle is a group of five prose romances centered on the love affair between Lancelot and Guenevere. It consists of an immense central core, the Lancelot Proper, introduced by The History of the Holy Grail and The Story of Merlin and concluded by The Quest for the Holy Grail and The Death of Arthur.

This volume brings together thirteen essays by noted scholars from the first symposium ever devoted exclusively to the Lancelot-Grail Cycle. Exploring the cycle's evolution across the literatures of medieval France, Italy, Spain, Catalonia, and England, the authors take a variety of approaches that highlight a broad range of cultural, social, historical, and political concerns and offer a comparative and interdisciplinary vision of this great romance.

William W. Kibler is the Superior Oil-Linward Shivers Centennial Professor of Medieval Studies and a professor of French at the University of Texas at Austin.


Watch the video: Bumpy Johnson Was Ready For War Over Malcolm X.